About Me

My name is Tim Chaffey. I’m a Bible-believing Christian, husband, father, teacher, apologist, author, and cancer survivor.

Making me look short

I have been happily married since 1996 and have a daughter and son. I enjoy spending time with his family, walking, basketball, swimming, and good theological discussions. In 2001, I was the starting center for a national championship basketball team. I swam the relay leg of half-Ironman triathlons in 2012 and 2013, and completed the Nation’s Triathlon in 2013 with Team in Training to raise funds for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

I currently work as the content manager for the Ark Encounter. I spent five years as a pastor and associate pastor, in which I taught youth ministry, adult Sunday School, and a weekly theology class in addition to regular preaching duties. I have also taught high school Bible and science classes for six years.

In 2011, I completed a Th.M. in Church History and Theology from Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary after successfully defending his thesis on The Sons of God and the Nephilim. In 2008, I earned a Master of Divinity degree (summa cum laude) specializing in Apologetics and Theology. I also hold a Master of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Biblical and Theological Studies.

I started Midwest Apologetics in 2005, a ministry dedicated to defending the word of God from the beginning to the end.

Having long been interested in the creation v. evolution controversy and the corresponding age of the earth battle, I co-authored my first book, Old-Earth Creationism on Trial: The Verdict Is In in 2008 with Jason Lisle, Ph.D. in Astrophysics.

I am also a cancer survivor, having been diagnosed with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in July 2006. I have been in full remission since September 2006. My second full-length book, God and Cancer, traces my battle with the disease, but focuses on providing insight and advice to others who are going through difficult times. The book concludes with an apologetic for the existence of God. This section demonstrates that suffering and evil do not provide evidence against the God of the Bible, but rather the Bible provides the only solution to this issue.

I have co-authored The Truth Chronicles youth fiction series. Book 1 (The Time Machine) was published in April 2010, book 2 (The Contest) in May 2010, book 3 (The Rescue) in June 2010, book 4 (The Thief) in April 2012, book 5 (The Chase) in Fall 2012, and book 6 (The Ark) in December 2013. These exciting books are designed to teach young people how to defend the faith, and learn more about the biblical worldview. A short story, which is actually a prequel to The Truth Chronicles series, is included in the short story anthology, Worlds of Faith.

But my favorite topic has long been the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. I recently published In Defense of Easter to address the historicity of the Resurrection, to defend it against the skeptical and critical attacks, and to discuss many of the practical implications of the fact that Jesus rose from the dead.

I have contributed to several other books as either an editor or writer. Notably, he has written multiple chapters in the following books: How Do We Know the Bible Is True? Volumes I & II, and Demolishing Supposed Bible Contradictions, Volume II.

 


Comments

About Me — 28 Comments

  1. I just want to say that your articles are SO refreshing! Thank you for not compromising God’s Word. I have to admit that my heart hurts so often when I hear of Christians being more influenced by man’s opinions rather than what God says. God is amazing and His Word is perfect! I want others to see that! So thank you again for speaking the truth in such love!

    • Deanna, thanks for the very encouraging words. I truly appreciate them. I pray that I will be able to continue to speak the truth in love. I’m convinced that far too often Christians try to be one without the other (love w/o truth or truth w/o love), but we’re aren’t being Christlike if we don’t do both. I strive to use my blog in a way that honors our Savior and I hope that others learn from that example. God bless!

    • I have just read your article highlighting the words of Mrs. Olsteen.
      Tomorrow during the morning message, my husband will be teaching the Biblical response to the idea of worship for “self”. I was quite interested in your life story as well, since our son who is a Hospice chaplain also is now cancer free after 4 years post surgery. His diagnoses came at age 29 and was followed by the replacement of his femur due to ewing sarcoma. I praise God for your writings, and for revealing his purpose daily in your life, in our son’s life, and in the life of my husband and myself.
      May God go before you in all you do.
      Darlene
      Pipe Creek, Texas

  2. Greetings Tim!

    We met at the Creation Museum earlier this year. My wife and I were visiting during our furlough and heard you speak concerning the Resurrection (I mentioned Licona’s book on the Resurrection).

    As we continue to work here in Kenya (a place where sound doctrine is often in short supply), God has been bringing people to my mind who are engaged in Christian Education. I simply wanted you to know that I thank God for you and how you are standing up for truth in a world that hates it. Keep standing upon God’s unchanging Word and preaching the unchanging Gospel! We are encouraged and continue to be encouraged through the ministry to which God has called you!

    May the Lord bless you and keep you! May He continue to fill you with the hope and power of the Resurrection!

    Till we no longer see in part!

    Phil

  3. Hi Tim, thanks for your page. I came across while looking for examples of verses taken out of context. Could you give an explanation of th rhema word? It seems like christians use the rhema principle to justify whatever they choose and apply out of context verses to suit their needs -simply by terming it a rhema word from God. Ps Are you the guy who was featured in Todd Friel’s Wretched TV? He mentioned your book which made mention of a selection of verses demonstrating God may indeed cause illness etc.

    • Hi David,
      Thanks for the kind words. I don’t believe I was the guy being talked about on Friel’s program. Perhaps he was talking about Tim Challies, a more popular blogger with almost as cool of a name as me. :)
      Regarding the term “rhema.” This word has been abused by many of the Word Faith preachers. Kenneth Hagin’s ministry or school was called Rhema. Bill Gothard made much of this term as well. I don’t think they viewed the term in precisely the same way, but they both abused the meaning. Basically, rhema means “word.” It appears several times in Scripture. Peter replied to Jesus’ instruction about throwing the net on the other side of the boat by saying, “Nevertheless, at your word (rhema)…” Hagin and other Word Faith folks made a big deal about it because they believe that a person can create with the words they speak. Bill Gothard, as far as I know, viewed rhema as a special word from God, as in the believer receiving special revelation from Him.
      I hope this helps.

    • So the Born Again of the Water in John 3 is not referring to Water Baptism–So Paul in Acts 16 was being hasty in Baptizing in Jailor after midnight–Why the rush since he had already Believed and as you say saved–What was Paul’s urgency–Was there a fear the Jailor might lose his life the next day-Every conversion in the New Testament always included Water Baptism -Even Jesus walked a long distance that He could be Baptized by John–When John hesitated Jesus explained it is to fulfill all righteousness–And last how do you baptize–Do you sprinkle, pour or immerse and if it is not necessary why argue over any difference and do you still use the titles Father, Son, and Holy Ghost or have you finally understood that His Name Shall Be Called Jesus for He shall save His people from their Sins–Prayerfully Consider

      • Charles, thanks for taking the time to read the post and for your comments. To claim that “every conversion in the New Testament always included Water Baptism” is a vast overstatement. First, the thief on the cross did not get baptized. Second, there are numerous conversions spoken of in the book of Acts where it does not tell us if the people were baptized (see Acts 13:12 and 17:34) for examples. I don’t doubt that these individuals were baptized at some point, but we aren’t told that in the text.
        How does my statement about “born of water” in John 3 mean that Paul was being hasty in Acts 16? What is the logical or exegetical connection here?
        Finally, I do believe that full immersion is the proper mode of baptism, but I do not believe the mode is as important as the reason for baptism.

        • Hi again, Tim -

          My question regarding baptism is this: “Is a person a candidate for baptism if they do not love Jesus Christ?” Outside the box, since loving Christ is never presented as a “condition.” But did Jesus come to give us a “formula” – a five-step procedure to avoiding hell? If the greatest commandment is to love the Lord with your whole heart, soul, mind and strength, then the greatest sin would be the violation of that commandment. If Christ came to show us the Father, then we know the one we are commanded to love. And if we meet Him and don’t love him, then we don’t really want Heaven, we just want to avoid the penalty for our sin.

          Most of the water-baptism-is-necessary people that I know are not secure in their salvation, but are Arminian, So even if they follow their 5-step formula perfectly, they still think it’s possible to be lost. My own conclusion is that “he who believes” in Mark 16 is baptized by the Holy Spirit and is saved. The “go and make disciples” of Matthew 28 is water baptism, since no one gets saved by being immersed and they obeying the commands of Christ. One must already be saved as a pre-condition to discipleship.

      • Charles, as important a topic as baptism is, it sounds to me as if you have an even bigger issue, namely, the Trinity. Judging by your closing comments, it appears that you are a believer in the Oneness doctrine. If God is triune, then denying this fact is a serious matter. If you believe that the Son did not exist until the Incarnation, then you are denying the deity of the Son, which is clearly taught in Hebrews 1.

        Consider Jesus’ words in John 5:23:
        “That all men should honour the Son, even as they honour the Father. He that honoureth not the Son honoureth not the Father which hath sent him.”

        If the Son is God, then to deny His true identity is to deny Him the honor you owe Him. As as this Scripture tells us, if you don’t honor the Son, you don’t honor the Father either. I would encourage you to reconsider your view of the nature of God.

  4. Tim -
    I completed a dual MA in the fine arts and social advocacy in 2012 with an emphasis on utilizing the arts as catalysts for social justice. During my graduate research and beyond, I realized most methodologies/ideologies really just hack at the branches, not the roots. I wrote papers on the problem of human evil, but due to the mainstream scholarship of the university, I didn’t include the demon/satanic piece. Since then I have been researching the niphillim and appreciate finding your work. I will be ordering your thesis (have read your blogs) and have a question: My focus is to fight evil with good in utilizing life affirming creativity to facilitate community transformation, but sometimes the realities are so overwhelming – and although I believe God is bigger – I’m learning evil is deeply malevolent. If the niphillim are post flood, then they are on the earth today. I believe prayer is huge in the fight, – but what are ways Christ followers can take an informed stand against this kind of evil? I’m considering pursuing a PhD with this as a focus. – M. P.

    • Hi Maria,
      Thanks for your kind comments and taking the time to read my posts. I agree that most methodolgies/ideologies just hack at the branches instead of the roots. Paul says that our battle is not against flesh and blood, but against spiritual forces (Eph. 6:12). Many Christians fail to remember this as we look at what is going on in our world.
      Regarding your comment about the post-Flood nephilim — it doesn’t necessarily follow that they would still be around. The book of Joshua tells us that Joshua wiped out all of the Anakim except for those in Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:22). Goliath was from Gath, and these are the same places where David’s mighty men fought against giants (1 Chronicles 20:4–8). I think one could build a pretty strong case that the post-Flood nephilim were wiped out or died off in the distant past. If they were around today, we would be able to see them since they would be quite tall. :)
      You are right that prayer is huge in this fight. Look at Paul’s answer to your question in Ephesians 6:13ff. Take up the whole armor of God and stand firm. We know that He who is in us is greater than he who is in the world. It would be great to see revival in this country and around the world, and I would love to see the tide of evil overturned. I know that many Christians do not agree with my view on the end times, but I don’t believe we’ll see this kind of revival and turning away of evil until the Lord returns. Until that time, our job is to stand boldly for the truth no matter the cost. Be encouraged! We’re on the winning side. God bless!

  5. Hi, Tim -

    A mutual friend (my daughter, Jessica) suggested I check you out on the web since we have a huge number of common interests. We were living in Rochester when you were at MBC. Since then, we’ve transplanted to North Carolina.

    I do a daily program on BlogTalkRadio and the topic of the Nephilim (“as it was in the days of Noah”) are of interest to me. Please check me out and let me know if you’d be interested in being a guest on my program. In the meantime, I’ll check out your book.

    Best,

    Steve
    Anakypto Forum on BlogTalkRadio

    • Hi Steve,
      It’s good to hear from you. I just connected with Jessica on facebook a week or two ago. I hope all is well with you guys. I’ll be in touch concerning the program.

  6. Tim,

    I may be opening a can of worms here. But I would love to hear your opinion on the consmption of alcohol. I se you mention many times context. I was raised pentecostal. Point blank, drinking at all is a sin. I have searched and read every scripture on the subject I could find. Though I truly believe getting DRUNK is a sin. I do not believe drinking in moderation is. One scripture I have been thrown is judges 13:4 “now therefore beware, I pray the, and drink not wine nor strong drink, and eat not any unclean thing.” Yes, when you read this scripture alone it seems pretty evident that you hould not drink. But if u read all of it you see it is an angel speaking to he mother of samson. informing her she is with child, and not to drink. This is only once scriptural example on the subject. But again, would love to hear your thoughts. God Bles.

    • Hi Brittany,
      That would be an interesting topic to address. There are certainly some strong opinions on it. I don’t know if someone can make a rock solid case that drinking in any and all circumstances is wrong (getting drunk definitely is). Paul told Timothy to drink some wine for his stomach ailments, and Jesus turned water into wine for people to consume. So I don’t believe a legalistic approach is the right one. However, there is also a danger of going too far the other direction. For those who think it is okay, they need to realize the huge ramifications their decisions can have (e.g., the example they are setting, the possibility of being a stumbling block for others, etc.). Personally, I never touch the stuff. I tell people that I’m drier than the Sahara. But that doesn’t mean that I condemn any of my fellow believers who choose to occasionally have a drink. That’s just scratching the surface of this topic, but I wanted to give you a few thoughts to go on.

  7. I just came across your blog. I enjoyed the explanation on Matthew, on the Romans verse, and the one about judging others. Yes, context is essential and application is pushing away from the context. I, myself, am all for context, so, I appreciated your comments on many verses like about the sons of GOD from the scroll of GENESIS 6. In the same way the fallen angels were active before the flood, the fallen angels will be–after the rapture of the CHURCH –very active before the judgment falling on earth. I think fallen angels has a role to get the race all messed up and GOD in both situation intervene. The plan of the devil is to crush GOD’s plan in any way or shape. That is only my opinion knowing there are other points out there.

  8. Hi Tim, thank you so much for your article on “Two or three are gathered..” I have held this opinion for a while but kept it to myself for fear of offending! There is another question I would like your response to: “For by His stripes we have been healed” has always been used to validate our requests for physical healing but I do’nt agree. I see the crucifiction of Christ as being a covenent regarding salvation. We know therefore that if someone sincerely asks Jesus for forgiveness and salvation, it is done. We dont doubt it for a minute. To use this scripture with physical healing, poses a problem to me as prayers for healing don’t always manifest in healing. My sister gets frustrated as she says the scripture applies to healing as well, but if we dont have the same certainty regarding prayers for healing, how do we know the new convert is saved? It is for that very reason I don’t think the two are covered by that scripture, just salvation. To my mind, it would have required a second covenant to pertain to healing!. When I pray for healing, I do it on the basis of James’ invitation James 5:14, 15 ” Is anyone sick among you…..I don’t see how we can piggyback anything onto salvation. Please respond.

    • Hi Desiree,
      I would agree with you about Isaiah 53. I do not believe that verse should be used to support physical healing. Despite what some people believe, we are never promised physical health in this life. The Bible tells us that Christians can expect persecution because the world hates us–this may include physical torment. Also, Hebrews 11 discusses people who had great faith, and near the end of the chapter, the writer talks about those who were destitute, tortured, scourged, stoned, sawn in two, or killed with the sword. It doesn’t work to say that they didn’t have enough faith–they are listed in the “faith hall of fame” (Hebrews 11).
      Can God heal people of physical ailments? Of course He can, but He never promised us that He would do that. Christ’s sacrifice, which is clearly depicted in Isaiah 53, was done to heal us of our spiritual problem–sin. While we still struggle with the flesh, believers have been forgiven of our sins and have a new nature that desires to please God.

  9. I am nearly finished with “Angels” by Ronald Showers, which you may be familiar with. He also supports the angelic infiltration doctrine. I first heard this from Robert Thieme over 40 years ago and was and remain persuaded that it is the only view that makes any sense, even if it seems repulsive to most. I’m sure that Satan’s fall and man’s fall was repulsive to God as well but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. I am quite convinced that as the super natural tenor of the Bible began to wane and allegory became the more acceptable, palatable view of Scripture, the church has suffered immeasurably. Our understanding of these super-natural phenomena is never going to be complete this side of Heaven, but the Bible provides enough information for our faith to rest on. Jesus did many miracles yet there were still those who refused to believe. This is always going to be the case, unfortunately, until time is no more. I am thankful that you have thought this subject important enough to write a thesis on and have enjoyed your posts. I have a Biblesoft commentary which I enjoy very much for most study purposes but as you pointed out, on this subject, they are all wrong. I try not to rush to judgment because of it but sometimes it is a little irritating. For since early childhood God has always been Super Natural to me, and I believed in HIS omnipotence, omnipresence, and omniscience (I had to or else He wouldn’t have been any different from man, and God just had to be more than man. And as more information became available to me, through excellent teaching, and more blanks started filling in in my understanding, things my spirit had hungered for, I was fully persuaded my faith had been well placed. There’s been no turning back for me in this path, through rough waters and calm seas He’s ever been and remains faithful to me. Again many thanks.
    jennifer claxton

  10. Dear Tim,

    I publish an entertainment website for Christian teens and tweens at: http://www.clashentertainment.com/ We also feature a lot of apologetics/Bible and science posts so you can see why I would be interested in touching base with you. Please check out our website and, if you feel led contact me for further discussion.

    Sincerely,

    Ken Raney

  11. Hello Mr. Chaffey!

    I have a question that I hope would be answered soon.

    Arecibo Observatory sent out a radio message containing binary code in 1974 as a celebration to an area called M13, about 25,000 light years away. Back in August of 2011, a cornfield across the street received the same binary code.

    Thinks to Google: Arecibo Message, Arecibo reply, Arecibo Chilbolton

    What I wanted to know is, if there is really life out there… would that contradict the Bible? Could a Christian accept the maybe-fact that there is life other than our own?

    Thanks,
    Matt

    • Hi Matt,
      Thanks for taking the time to write. Re: alien life and the Bible. I outlined some of the problems with the idea of alien life in my post about ancient aliens. Although there is not one verse in Scripture that says, “There are no alien life forms elsewhere in the universe” we can make some reasonable deductions to show why this concept is contrary to the Word of God. Furthermore, the idea of alien life stems from an evolutionary worldview, so although a person can be a Christian and believe in aliens, it would be far better for that person to use God’s Word as the authority. In it we find that earth is unique and the focal point of God’s redemptive plan. There are no biblical reasons to believe in aliens, but there are several good reasons to reject it.
      Also, re: the Arecibo Message and Chilbolton circles. I would encourage you to read the response from SETI. Remember, this is a group that desperately wants to find traces of life elsewhere, so the fact that they reject these circles and the arguments they make against them are telling. I don’t agree with their evolutionary presuppositions, but they make a strong case for rejecting the Chilbolton formations.
      Thanks for reading.
      Tim

  12. Hello Tim. I am Doug from Cleveland. I met you at the creation museum Friday June 24 2011. My wife and kids were sitting in the front row for your GENESIS teaching. I came home to do homework today and this is what I was met with. I attend Kaplan University and currently taking a science class. SC300 Big Ideas in Science: Methods and Mutations. Thought you might like to read what they are teaching us.

    “Young-Earth Creationism and Intelligent Design

    Opposition to Darwin did not end in the nineteenth century. In the United States today, many vocal opponents to Darwin’s theory believe in young-Earth creationism, which is based on a literal interpretation of the Bible. Three central tenets of young-Earth creationism are:

    1. Earth and the universe were created relatively recently, no more than about 10,000 years in the past.

    2. All life-forms were created by God in a miraculous act, in essentially their modern forms.

    3. The present disrupted Earth’s surface and the distribution of fossils are primarily the consequence of a great catastrophic flood.

    These beliefs differ dramatically from many of the scientific ideas presented in this book. The big bang origin of the universe (Chapter 15), the origin of the solar system (Chapter 16), the span of geological history (Chapters 17 and 18), and the chemical origin and evolution of life (this chapter) are all at odds with these religious beliefs. It’s not surprising, therefore, that science and creationism have come into conflict. In particular, evidence in favor of evolution requires a very old Earth and a means for transforming one species into another. Darwin’s idea of natural selection, particularly as applied to the origin of human beings, is uncomfortable to many people because Homo sapiens cannot lay claim to a history that is intrinsically different from other species.

    In the early 1980s, the Arkansas State Legislature passed a law requiring that the biblical story of creation be taught alongside the theory of evolution in public schools. Federal courts eventually ruled that this law was an attempt to impose religious beliefs in the public schools, something expressly forbidden by the U.S. Constitution. It is now against the law to teach creationism as part of any public school science curriculum.

    Young-Earth creationists then adopted a different strategy by trying to eliminate evolution from public school curricula. In 1999, for example, the Kansas State Board of Education had a majority of elected members sympathetic to the creationist position. They voted to eliminate any references to the big bang, Earth’s origin, historical geology, and biological evolution from statewide standardized science tests. That decision was overturned in 2001, when a new board was elected, but similar challenges continue to arise in many states and have reemerged in Kansas.

    The latest opposition to teaching evolution is in the guise of the “doctrine of intelligent design,” or ID. Proponents of ID argue that life on Earth is so extraordinarily complex that it could not possibly have emerged through any natural process. An intelligent engineer must have done the job (though ID advocates avoid talking about who designed the designers). In 2005 U.S. District Judge John E. Jones heard a case centering on the science curriculum in the town of Dover, Pennsylvania, and ruled that ID is simply another form of creationism. Consequently, intelligent design cannot be taught as a scientific alternative to evolution in the public schools (Figure 25-21).

    AP/Wide World Photos.

    Figure 25-21 In December, 2005, in a case in the U.S. District Court involving the Dover Area High School, Judge John E. Jones ruled that intelligent design is based on a religious belief, and therefore should not be introduced into public school science classrooms.

    We maintain that it is reasonable, perhaps even desirable, to discuss different ways of knowing about the origin and evolution of life in classes on the history of ideas, or comparative religions, or even current events. However, we view efforts to eliminate the teaching of evolution or to promote the creationist agenda in a science classroom as misguided and a significant threat to the integrity of public science education. We argue that evolution is an essential unifying concept in biology and thus is a critical aspect of any scientific education. All students should be expected to understand the principle of evolution and to be familiar with the extensive observational evidence that scientists have discovered to support it, even if they don’t believe that evolution actually happened.

    To what extent do you think that parents or local school boards should have the right to decide what scientific theories and ideas are presented in schools? To what extent do you think parents ought to have the right to demand that opposing religious views be taught as well? Should the views of creationism, which are primarily based on one particular type of Christianity, be given special consideration? ”

    I am shocked at the teaching of “FACT” not theory. I am currently working on starting an evangelist ministry, starting with speaking to men, that leads with what God did to restore my life and my family and then tells the truth of scripture, and then delivers the Gospel as the ultimate truth and authority ovar all. I am excited to be given the chance to spread the message.
    Thank you for your story, your faithfulness, and your message. We are blessed by your work.
    BE GREAT.
    Douglas Boose

    • Hi Doug,
      It was great to meet you and your family yesterday at the museum. Thank you for the kind words and for your efforts to share the truth of God’s Word.
      Although the quote above is very slanted, it’s a bit gentler than I expected. They still try to portray it as a religion v. science debate, but really it is a worldview v. worldview. There are some inaccuracies as well, but that’s to be expected when you try to indoctrinate someone against the truth.
      I pray that God will bless you and your family as you serve Him in ministry and in your daily walks. Always remain faithful to God’s Word and He will use you in amazing ways. Let me know if/when you guys come to the museum or one of our conferences.

    • Hi Sean,
      I read through the article on the link you posted. Frankly, I think the guy’s “theory” is extremely far from biblical. There are so many things for which he has absolutely no evidence, and many of the claims are contrary to Scripture. For example, there was no life on other planets at the time life was created here. In fact, God made the earth first, and made the stars, planets, etc., three days later. He created life on earth and this planet is the focal point of His plans. God became a man to die for man on earth, and Hebrews tells us that He died for sinners “once for all.” So i do not believe there is sentient life on other planets.
      That being said, I plan to refute some of these ideas in an upcoming post on the Sons of God and the Nephilim. I do think there may be a connection between what happened in Genesis 6 and what many people consider to be alien activity. While I don’t believe aliens exist, I do think that demons can deceive people under this guise. It would not surprise me if that is what we have been seeing with the alien abduction phenomenon. I’ll write more on this within the next few weeks. Thanks for reading.

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